Developing a PC Strategy: Part Three

By Richard Gooding

What is the most important thing I should be doing right now?

Maricopa County has slots for approximately 5,100 Democratic PCs, or one PC slot per 120 registered Democrats. At the time of the 2016 election, there were a paltry 880 Democratic PCs, or one PC per 700 Democrats. It is impossible for each PC to engage that many individuals. Fortunately, things have improved since the election. Maricopa has doubled that number to about 1,800 PCs. Unfortunately, that still means there is only one PC for every 340 registered Democrats. This same pattern holds for most other counties in the state.

Bottom line: if the Democrats are going to win at the ground game, which is the only way we can win, we need to fill every PC slot in the state with trained, engaged and empowered PCs. We need to get to a manageable ratio of one PC per 100-125 registered Democrats.

AZ Blue 2020 has been doing presentations and webinars to recruit PCs. While those have been moderately successful, we need to shift the focus. The clock is ticking.

The quickest way to fill the remaining PC slots throughout the state is for every PC to recruit two additional PCs. If the 1,800 PCs in Maricopa each recruited two PCs, we would have over 5,100 PCs. Therefore, the most important thing a PC should be doing right now is recruiting two additional PCs.

Do the people you recruit have to become PCs? Do they need to canvass? The answer to both is no. Volunteers with a wide range of skills and interests are needed. Some people won’t want to canvass but will write letters, postcards or phone bank. Others might be happy holding house parties, being the “Comfort Captain” on the team, or data person, pulling walk lists. All are welcomed.

Recruiting New PCs and Volunteers

Some recruiting will occur naturally when you are canvassing your neighborhood. You may meet an engaged constituent who wants to do more than vote. Invite that person to become a PC or volunteer.

A bigger challenge is recruiting in precincts with no PCs. How do you plant seeds in those areas? These precincts often have many registered Democrats whom need to be engaged but no one to do the engaging.

The first step is to identify the targeted precinct(s) and cut a list of high-efficacy Democrats in that precinct. These are the leads you need to mine.

You can reach them by canvassing the precinct going door-to-door or by phone banking. The phone banking process has been successfully deployed in LD 9, where close to 100 PCs were recruited over a four-month period.

Our recommended next steps:

  1. Hold a Group Phone Banking Party. Phone banking with others is much more fun than doing it by yourself. Recruit other PCs in your LD. Divide up the call list of high-efficacy Democrats and start dialing.
  2. Try the following script. It works.

“Hi, this is _______, I’m a Democrat in your neighborhood. I am calling other Democrats in the neighborhood to see if they can give us a helping hand over the next 12 months as we prepare for the 2018 election. As you know, the Democratic Party needs a lot of help, especially at the grassroots level.

Observe their reaction to the Party to judge their interest.

“Would you consider helping us out by being a volunteer in our ground game?”

If they are interested, they will ask about the duties and requirements for volunteers. You should describe it broadly and let them know there are a wide range of things volunteers can do to support the Party.

If they indicate they can’t help now, find out if they can help closer to the election. A “no” may actually be a “not now.”

If they are not interested now or in the future,

“Thank for your vote and continued support of the party.”

Go to the next person on the list.

  1. If they are interested, invite them to a small gathering with other potential volunteers. You need to pick a date and time for the meeting, as well as a location in the middle of the targeted precinct. If there were PCs in the precinct, you could hold a house party but there aren’t any PCs yet.

A few of the people who are interested in volunteering are going to meet for coffee next week to learn more about how they can help. We are meeting on (date and location). Would you like to join us?”

If they can’t meet at that time,

“When would you be able to meet?”

At this point, you can use their requested date and time when making your next calls or you can have two separate meetings.

  1. Next, each PC holds their volunteer recruitment meeting. This is the small meeting in a coffee shop (or other central, public location) with two or three potential volunteers. You should share your story, learn about why they want to be involved and identify what skills and resources they are willing to volunteer.

 

At the end of this meeting, you should have a clear idea of who is interested in taking their involvement to the next level. You can share with them what a PC does and provide them a copy of the PC Survival Guide. You can even have them fill out the Appointed PC form on the spot.

Where things go from here may vary depending on your LD and the training they provide to new PCs.

Based on the experience in LD 9, starting with a list of 100 high-efficacy Democrats, you should be able to talk to 25-30 people, which should result in five potential volunteers for you to meet. The best time to call is Saturday morning and Sunday afternoon.

We’d like to hear about your progress, any tips you might have and, most importantly, how many PCs you recruit.

If we all take a little bite of the elephant, we can bring it to its knees.

Developing a PC Strategy: Part Two

By: Richard Gooding

What is the PC’s job?

The PC’s job is to get Democrats elected. Canvassing, phone banking, letter writing and house parties are some of the tools PCs are expected to use to turn out the vote and elect Democrats. While most agree with the end goal, there are different perspectives on why and how it should be done. We believe the most effective and sustainable way to elect Democrats is to effectuate a grassroots model, a paradigm whose power flows from the bottom up, not the top down.

Who does a PC represent? The Democratic Party or their constituents?

PCs are the foundation of the Democratic Party but they do not represent the Democratic Party, nor do they represent or work for any particular Democratic candidate. This type of top-down approach runs counter to the fact that the power of the party resides in the PCs, not in the candidates or party leadership. PCs are elected public officials within the Democratic party and it is the constituents within their precincts who elect them. Just like any other elected official, the PC represents his/her constituents. Further support for the bottom up paradigm is that, in Arizona, the party leadership is elected not by the public, but rather the PCs. It is the PCs who the elect the Democratic leadership within their LD, county, state and national committees and, as such, the party leadership should work for the PCs to effectively maximize this bottom up approach.

What is a PC’s job in 2018?

The PC’s job in 2018 is to get 10, 20 or 30 of their Democratic neighbors who would not vote in a midterm election to vote. It is that simple! If every PC accomplishes this one goal, we turn Arizona blue in 2018.

As a PC you represent about 100 Democrats in your precinct/neighborhood. In a typical midterm election, like 2014, 48 of those 100 people will vote regardless of your influence. That leaves 52 registered Democrats in your neighborhood that, based on past midterm elections, will not vote in 2018. Your job is to get 10, 20 or 30 of those 52 non-voters to vote. Even more encouraging?  37 of those 52 non-voters did in fact vote in the 2016 Presidential election; they just need to be motivated to cast their ballots during midterms as well.

Do I need to talk to Independents?

A lot of people argue we need to talk to Independents. The main reason for this suggestion is that about 1/3 of the state’s voters are registered as Independents. While this is true, is your time better spent meeting and establishing a relationship with your 52 Democratic constituents to convince them to vote? Or spending time trying to persuade Independents? With your Democratic constituents you need only to persuade them to vote. With Independents, you need to persuade them to vote and to vote for the Democratic candidate.

Also, think about why someone is registered as an Independent. First, they may feel disenfranchised by the political process; they don’t believe their vote counts. This is supported by the fact that Independents typically have the lowest turnout rate. Second, they vote for the candidate or issue, not the party. If the Democratic candidate is not appealing to Independents, they may cast a vote for a different parties’ candidate or may not vote at all if none of the candidates are appealing.

It is the candidate’s job to convert persuadable Independent votes, not the PCs’ job. Before setting out to persuade Independents, make sure you have done all the necessary work to get 10, 20 or 30 of your low-turnout Democrats to vote in 2018.

What Does Success Look Like?

Success is easy to measure. What was the voter turnout for your 100 constituents? How many of the 52 low-turnout Democrats voted in the 2018 election?

Your job as a PC is that simple. Others will want to distract you. Do not let them.

One Year…285 Days to Go…

By Richard Gooding

One year ago, I participated in the Phoenix Women’s March expecting 4,000-5,000 people at the State Capital. 20,000 people including my daughter and grandchildren marched with their handcrafted signs. 40,000 people marched across the state in 2017. It brought tears to my eyes and a lump in my throat to see so many diverse people coming together, passionate about changing the politics of this country. They were not going to sit back and accept what had happened. They were going to resist, to stand up for what makes this country great! It reminded me of the 1969 march in Washington protesting the Vietnam War. I personally had to do something. But what?

I’d read the Individual Guide, but Indivisible’s primary goal at the time was to resist the Trump agenda. While an important cause in itself, I wanted to do something more proactive to change the political environment in Arizona. I wanted to play offense rather than defense.

At 5:00 am, January 26, 2017, I sat down at my computer and registered AZ Blue 2020 as an Indivisible group. From the start it was a family and friends endeavor. We created a Facebook group and our daughters invited all their friends to join. Over 100 members joined in just two days. We reserved the AZblue2020.org and created a website. We held our first AZ Blue 2020 organizing meeting on April 9th where we shared the AZ Blue 2020 vision with over 60 attendees and many signed up to be part of our team.

Along the way we have met many wonderful people whom I cannot personally thank enough for contributing to the AZ Blue 2020 mission of empowering the citizens of Arizona to turn the state blue. They will be friends for life. They have created inspiring videos that tell the AZ Blue 2020 story; published training materials to recruit and train Precinct Committeepeople (PCs); produced informative marketing materials to communicate our cause and coordinated outreach events to spread our message state wide, from Tucson to Pinetop. These are the people that made AZ Blue 2020 what it is today. Thank you for all you have done.

This year 25,000 people celebrated at the Women’s March to the Polls. My daughter and grandkids were there again. But the attitude had changed as reflected in the evolved name “March to the Polls”. People want to do more than resist Trump’s agenda. We are tired of Trump chaos, tired of playing defense. We want change. We want to get progressives elected. We see with delight what happened in Virginia and in special elections across the US where red seats were flipped to blue. If they can do it in red Alabama, we can do it in Arizona!

There are 285 days until the 2018 election. Time to get busy. If you want to do more than just vote, become a Precinct Committeeperson and make sure all your Democratic neighbors vote. Working together we can turn Arizona blue.

Looking Back, Moving Forward

Reflection and revisiting are common practices this time of year. Looking back on 2017 from a personal perspective, I can think of an abundance of moments for which to be grateful and to celebrate. When looking back at 2017 from a wider lens however, it can be difficult to see much worth smiling about.

Under the current political climate, people of color, immigrants, women, people in poverty and LGBTQ communities have all taken some serious blows. These steps backwards, combined with an ever more volatile international landscape, can leave us all feeling pretty overwhelmed and hopeless about where things are headed. But let’s be honest; we are progressives. We perpetually look for the good, the light at the end of the tunnel, the silver lining in every atrocity. It is our “bleeding hearts” and our commitment to fight for the voiceless that will always move us forward. In the hopes of kindling a smidge of positivity, here are some wins scored for the Patron Saints of Democracy:

Alabama Senate seat

Numerous wins in Virginia, including state legislature and Governor

New Jersey Governor

Seats in Florida and New Hampshire

Record number of everyday Americans running for office on a progressive platform

Record number of political engagement and grassroots efforts

Remarkable members of the judicial system standing up against violations of human rights

The special elections we have seen over the past few months show what can be done. They illustrate the capacity of what We The People are able to accomplish when we come together. It is not only exciting but a driving force.

So after reflection comes resolution. What will I do? What can I do? For everyone this will be different. For some it will be a fulltime commitment to the cause, a decision to run for local office. For others, an obligation to canvas or phone bank, to become a PC, to registering voters, help at the polls or Get Out the Vote. The list of ways to do your part is abundant and each is important.

As 2018 begins we must remember the blows will, unfortunately, keep coming. The bad guys will continue their agenda against those we have vowed to protect. The anger, frustration and sadness will likely grow as we continue to watch progress be undone. But we must turn those feelings into action and energy. We must focus on the end game, that light at the end of the tunnel we know exists. We have to push through the shit storm and do the work. It can be done. And I look forward to writing a very different story this time next year.

We Will Make It Count

By Jaclyn Boyes

As I stood in the FedEx store on Central Ave watching the photos print of Taliesin Myrddin Namkai-Meche and Ricky Best, the men who were stabbed to death on train for protecting a Muslim woman, and the photo of Heather Heyer, the young woman who was killed in Charlottesville, the reality of their sacrifice overwhelmed my heart.

Trying to keep tears from falling on the fresh prints, I hurried out of the store and over to a friend’s house to make my protest sign. These Americans deserved a better president. They died as a part of the resistance. But a resistance to what? Republicans? Trump? I didn’t know. I only knew I wanted to follow the call to action from Heather’s Mom – “We’re Gonna Make it Count.”

In the days leading up to the protest many of my friends had decided against attending due to the recent violence in Charlottesville. I was slightly worried there wouldn’t be many people in attendance. But, as I turned the corner on 3rd St and Washington my fear evaporated. Standing with signs and t-shirts, expressing the many sentiments I feel towards this administration, were thousands of people. I immediately felt stronger. It was the same feeling I had attending the Women’s March in Washington DC, a feeling that we are stronger together.

However, within a few short minutes, I realized there was something much different about this rally. On the corner of the street was a man with a bullhorn shouting horrific racial slurs and with him were other white supremacist holding derogatory signs against Black Lives Matter and Muslims. I immediately found myself in a group of people shouting “terrorist” and “get out of my city.” Strangely, just minutes before I was calmly helping lost Trump supporters find their way to the right side of the street.

After the police moved the white supremacists away from the crowd, I sat on the side of the street with my head in my hands. Why did my typical response of love towards the opposition change to one of intense outrage and anger? I looked down at my sign, at the faces of the victims of domestic terrorism, and in that moment understood what they were resisting. These Americans gave their lives resisting the rise of white supremacy.

I now understand that when you deeply care for your country and humanity, the most loving thing you can do is to tell a white supremacist loudly and clearly that their hate will not be tolerated. Then, you match the level of outrage with the same level of organization. I choose to channel my outrage towards local organizing that will help turn Arizona Blue. I cannot single-handedly stop white supremacy, but I can work to elect officials who will do what Trump has refused to do–stand up against white supremacy and domestic terrorism in America.

Taliesin, Ricky, and Heather, we will make it count.

The Art of Retail Politics

By Michael Harris

Congratulations, you’re a Precinct Committeeperson! Like many of us, you got fired up after the election, found your Legislative District and said “sign me up!” You just had to DO something!

PCs are the bedrock of the party. When you hear about the “ground game” of a campaign, that’s YOU. You mobilize people. You spread the word. You’re the “go-to” in your community circles. That all sounds fine, but how do you get to that point? How do reach a level where you can pick up the phone or send an email and get 100 people heading for the door?

It all comes down to building relationships. And relationships all come down to a few simple things.

When you’re first starting out as a PC, you might be tempted to ask people for things. Don’t. Let’s face it, we are all turned off when people come out of the blue and hit us up for anything, no matter how small it is. Instead, try offering things.

When you introduce yourself, tell people you are there to make sure people in your neighborhood are up to date on what’s happening in the party, and, more importantly, that you can keep the party up to date on what matters to them. You’re their voice. Offer to provide regular updates via a newsletter, coffee visits, or whatever forum works best for your area. People are hungry for information and reassurance that somebody is, in fact, doing something. Feed them!

That’s the first step. The second: keep doing it. Show up and be consistent. People trust others that do what they say. Make small promises and keep them. Do it again.

Once you’ve built a relationship and credibility, you can start asking questions. What do they think? What do they need? What are they worried about? Don’t promise to solve their problems, but let them know you’ll pass them on and find out more about options.

If you’ve gotten to this point, you’ve built trust and rapport with people in your precinct. The next ingredient: Fun. Find something you can celebrate together and make that the theme. Host a small party or picnic. The precinct that plays together, stays together.

Building these relationships takes time. It may feel frustrating that you’re only reaching a few people at a time. But an incremental approach will pay off when the time comes. You will know who you can count on to volunteer, to donate, and to bring others. You will know what will get people to go to the ballot box and what will keep them away. You’ll know when a candidate is going to resonate or fall flat. And you’ll know you can pick up the phone and mobilize them all when the time comes.

It’s a strategic choice to build intentional relationships. But these people are in your care. You are a PC! You are the bedrock. Because you bring the people.

We the People

By Sarah Meaney

The We the People Summit was created to unite people from all levels of political involvement and areas of the state in one place for one day of learning and activism. Organizers collected panels of experts to educate the public on a multitude of topics from creating sustainable organizations to the history of social and political movements. It was to be a day of impact.

Walking into the convention center, past the line forming at the door, I could see tables covered with name tags for the nearly 1,500 people in attendance. I grabbed my lanyard and name tag and headed to the AZ Blue 2020 tent. There was the team in matching blue shirts, displaying our new PC video under the big blue tent.

Shortly after I arrived, the slow and steady stream of people began. They grabbed coffee and milled about in a dull roar of conversation. Many of the people who passed were familiar allies, but the number of new faces was what had us most excited.

I began stickering people and striking up conversations. There were people from Yuma, Lake Havasu, the Democratic Party, the Green Party, current legislators and candidates. People came from all over the state with all different backgrounds.

In between stickering, I stopped at the Progressive Voices podcast table and chatted with Scott and Cara. While there, Athena Salman talked about her experience as a first year representative.

The corridor emptied as the first sessions began. I attended a session with OFA and got some valuable tips for sustaining a group’s members and creating consistent messaging.

Back in the corridor, I continued stickering and promoting visits to the AZ Blue 2020 tent. I stopped by the Save Our Schools Arizona table to talk to fellow volunteers and was asked by Dawn, head of communications, to film a short tutorial about why I support SOSAZ and the SB1431 referendum. That was an easy ‘yes’. I changed my shirt, the SOSAZ tee folded and packed in my backpack, alongside camera equipment and lots of business cards. After the video tutorial, some people stopped me to crack jokes about the ‘uniform’ change. I changed shirts a couple more times that day.

At the next forum, I learned about 501(c)¾ organizations and the tax rules associated with each designation. Fun stuff. After learning how to avoid tax evasion charges, I attended the Leaders’ Lunch. The founding members of many groups were in attendance. The creator of ResistBot spoke, along with AZ Resist and SOSAZ members.

I skipped the afternoon sessions to rejoin the AZ Blue 2020 team back at our blue tent. We received lots of traffic. Jodi signed up six new precinct committeepersons and a number of attendees signed up for our newsletter. We had many groups interested in scheduling AZ Blue 2020 for presentations and even secured a spot on a future Zod and Drea podcast.

Before the last session was over, the AZ Blue 2020 tent was visited by Deedra Abboud, as well as CD8 Candidate, Brianna Westbrook. Ms. Westbrook recorded us live on Periscope while Tricia Sauer interviewed.

When the final session of the day ended and the last bit of traffic filtered out of the corridor, our team packed up and headed to dinner. We stopped at my favorite downtown spot, Carly’s on Roosevelt. We ate, drank and shared our experiences from the day. It really was a day of impact.

White Mountain Roadshow

By TJ Cuddy

You would never guess how many Park-and-Ride locations exist throughout the East Valley, until you ask a group to meet at one. The proposed departure time found candidates and campaign staff scattered among multiple locations. The calls, texts and reroutes were fast and furious and, after a short while, the group assembled at a single location. The trip was officially underway.

Our roadshow carpool consisted of Outreach team members TJ Cuddy and Sarah Meaney, along with an all-star cast of candidates and surrogates including Arizona Democratic Party Vice-Chair Karyn Lathan, Arizona Attorney General candidate January Contreras, U.S. Senate candidate Deedra Abboud, campaign staff for Arizona’s Superintendent of Public Instruction candidates Kathy Hoffman and David Schapira.

In an effort to expand our operations into the rural communities of Arizona, events and meetings have and continue to take place in Pima and Pinal Counties. But this Roadshow was aimed at bringing our message to Navajo County, a rural county in the northeast that spans across Legislative Districts six and seven. AZ Blue 2020 Outreach organized a team of candidates, campaign staff and ADP officials to bring a group of exciting and engaging speakers to the White Mountain Indivisible and White Mountain Democrats groups in Pinetop-Lakeside.

The event was the definition of a collaborative win/win, with all parties involved as beneficiaries. A meet and greet prior to the general meeting afforded candidates and Outreach team members the opportunity to meet local dignitaries, party officials and county elected officials. White Mountain Indivisible arranged catering for the meet and greet and coordinated with the president of the White Mountain Democrats to organize the joint meeting. During the course of the meeting, we were able to discuss the reasons for AZ Blue 2020’s formation, the organization’s mission, guiding principles and plan for success. Outreach team member TJ Cuddy gave the AZ Blue 2020 PC Recruitment Presentation. Candidates, eager to spread their message and garner support among all Arizona communities, gave their stump speeches and took questions from the audience of about 35 attendees.  

Despite the disjointed beginning to our journey, the roadshow was an overwhelming success. Leaders from the Northern Arizona groups were appreciative of the outreach effort and look forward to future opportunities to connect with groups from around the state.  The candidates were grateful for the opportunity to engage with constituents in an often overlooked area of the state. AZ Blue 2020 was able to recruit several new PC applications for the Navajo County Democratic Party and connect several new PCs to AZ Blue 2020’s mission to empower PCs with tools, resources and best practices.

Our rural areas are important and deserve to be represented in the discussion of voter rights, education and healthcare. It is by connecting these communities to the issues and giving them the road map to create change that AZ Blue 2020 will achieve the goal of turning Arizona blue. AZ Blue 2020’s mission is to continue to facilitate the success of the party across the state by raising people.

Stay connected to AZ Blue 2020 for more reporting as we continue our roadshow across the state of Arizona. Send us an email at info@azblue2020.org if you want our Outreach Roadshow to visit your community.

Man with a Mission

By Gene Smith

I became a PC for the opportunity to get involved in my community. Voting every election was not cutting the mustard and I wanted to increase my civic engagement. I attended a meeting with like-minded citizens, equally frustrated with the state of affairs and it was here I was first introduced to the role of a PC. The importance of dedicated and trained PCs was immediately evident and AZ Blue 2020 drew me in with their enthusiasm.  By becoming a PC, I would be a positive influence in my community. I signed up on the spot.

This decision opened the door to a world I never anticipated and the benefits are continually unfolding. Long story short, by becoming a PC and attending my monthly LD meetings, I met a candidate and am now his Campaign Manager. Together, we are going to unseat Trent Franks. Together, our positive impact on our community grows. Together, we increase our level of civic engagement.

In addition, the evolution of this journey has allowed me to contribute skills accumulated over a lifetime of work and experience. The versatility of these experiences has led to a new nickname, “the Swiss army knife”. It has been an extremely rewarding experience to use my varied skill sets as problem solving tools. For example, the most common question I encounter in my new role is, “What is a PC ?” Fortunately, one of the tools tucked inside this “knife” is the ability to make videos. Using my video experience, I was able to make a training video answering that very question. The mission is to teach new PCs the duties of the position, explain how to engage people in conversation, and share the Democratic platform in an attempt to counter false rhetoric and propaganda.

This is my calling.

IDK, OMG…WTF?

People, can we talk about the acronyms, please!?!? As new PCs, we are all experiencing a learning curve with the lingo, particularly the never-ending list of acronyms. So, with that in mind, we have put together a list of commonly used abbreviations. Most are PC specific. Some we’ve run across because PCs come from many different backgrounds and bring their own jargon with them. And some, well, some are here just because we KIR.

PC: Hopefully this is a short way to describe you. And if not, what are you waiting for? It means Precinct Committeeperson. Also relationship builder, community guru, and Party Superhero.

LD: If you spent much of high school in a small room with five of your closest friends pouring over, amassing and then filing news articles, it means Lincoln-Douglas. But in our circle, it’s short for Legislative District.

CD: It used to mean that thing that came after cassettes but before mp3s. Now it means Congressional District.

ADP: Arizona Democratic Party. More pull than a county, less pull than national.

OMG: A natural response appropriate for a myriad of situations. Ex: “OMG! Did Ducey talk to anyone in Michigan before signing SB1431?” or “OMG, Jeff Flake was so dismissive at his Town Hall.” or “OMG! I just recruited my first PC!”

ADLCC: Arizona Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee. I think this one wins for most syllables in a title. We appreciate this acronym.

GOTV: Get Out the Vote. The opposite of the multisyllabic ADLCC, there are only four syllables in the whole phrase, but who wants to type all those little words every time?

SMH: The appropriate response for when you ask a person to sign a petition to Save Our Schools (SOS) and they respond they “don’t do” politics…Shaking My Head.

ALEC: Cue Darth Vader’s theme music. This stands for American Legislative Exchange Council.

SOP: Standard Operating Procedure. As in, “Launch the SOP to reach and engage PCs and potential PCs so we have a ready and willing army of volunteers come 2018.”

VAN: Not the “stranger-danger” kind, not the “soccer-mom” kind, but the Voter Activation Network kind. Full of more tidbits of info than Cheerios in the backseat of a minivan.

LOL: The sound that unwillingly escapes you when, as a PC, you meet other like-minded people who have been living in your neighborhood for years unbeknownst to you. Short for Laugh Out Loud. Not to be confused with LMAO, which is used when listening to Trump describe his inauguration numbers.

PAC: Political Action Committees. These groups pool money to spend for or against candidates or issues. AZ Blue 2020 is a PAC made up of small, individual donations from a group of grassroots organizers looking to impact growth in the ADP.  PACs get dicey when funded by large corporations trying to leverage money for influence.

IEC: Independent Expenditure Committee. Also known as Super PACs. *sigh* We like them when they’re for our candidate or issue but not when they’re not. Can we all agree there’s just too much money in politics?

AHCA: Abbreviation for Tax Cut for the Uber Wealthy. I know, it’s weird they got the letters wrong…

WTF: The abridged version of what silently goes through your mind when you encounter a voter who supports the current administration and it’s policies. What we actually say? “Thank you for your time. I’ll remove you from our list.” Because, ICYMI, when they go low, we go high.